Flora Grubb, the Succulent Lover’s Mecca – and My New Garden E-Books

I’ve been a member of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) since 2003. Despite the fact that I’ve won a couple of design awards from this organization and am delighted to be a certified member, until this year I had never attended any of its annual conferences. This year, I vowed, would be different. My son had just moved to the Bay Area and the conference was being organized primarily as an opportunity to tour gardens throughout the area, meeting some of the designers and learning through seeing in person, with written materials delivered via iPad rather than exclusively in lecture settings.

But what really cinched the deal for me was when I learned that the very first event of the tour would be a visit to Flora Grubb Gardens – a dinner reception the night the conference opened. I’ve developed a real love for succulents and consider it somewhat unfair that the most enticing varieties aren’t hardy here. I do have a client with an incredibly wet back yard, save for one area where we have planted lots of creeping sedums and included sempervivums along with other rock-garden plants like Gaura and dianthus. But it’s too cold for agave, and we often find we have to replace the sempervivums in the spring if the winter has been wet.

At Flora Grubb’s store (out a ways from central San Francisco), we ate dinner from food trucks but mostly lusted after the plants, the pots, and the other garden furnishings on display. A bicycle planted with succulents, carnivorous plants in a sink, air plants decorating a freestanding wall, and a vertical wall hanging planted chock full of succulents. I’ll just stop chattering away and let the photos speak for themselves. It was nirvana.

For more information about Flora Grubb, including links to her Web Shop (where I just ordered some great little holiday gifts for clients), click here.

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Speaking of holiday gifts, I’ve just turned two of my Blurb books into e-books if you’re interested in having a virtual copy. Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden can be purchased as an e-book for $4.99 by clicking here, and the Garden Conservancy Open Days book (priced at $3.99) by clicking here. I can attest that they look great on an iPad!

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6 Comments on “Flora Grubb, the Succulent Lover’s Mecca – and My New Garden E-Books”

  1. willisjww Says:

    Hi Melissa, you’re right the pictures of the e-book look great on the iPad. My only suggestion would be that one doesn’t really need the pseudo-book effect on the borders. I’d rather fill the screen with your photos, but maybe that’s a Blurb limitation.

  2. Melissa Says:

    I agree with you about the presentation – but that’s the way Blurb has set it up. It’s true for both the previews and the actual e-book format, although you can “enlarge” any given page using pinch and spread motions.


  3. what’s a blurb book? are your books available in actual paper? Lovely photos.

    • Melissa Says:

      Blurb.com is the online publisher I’ve used for some of my photo books. If you go to the “My Books” page of the blog you can click on the covers for each book and it will take you to a page where you can purchase them either invented form or as an e-book. Thanks for the kind words about my photography!


  4. Beautiful! Melissa, have a lovely Christmas — I am missing Washington right now. (Love the background “snow,” btw.)


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